Gallery: Works in Japan

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Futako Tamagawaen (Twin Rivers of Tamagawa)
Futako Tamagawaen (Twin Rivers of Tamagawa)
Collection of Tokyo University of Art Museum
Gold, Silver, Sumi and Mineral Pigments on Kumohada
180x180cm

Futako Tamagawaen was Fujimura's M.F.A. Thesis painting, and won the purchase prize at Tokyo University of Art in 1989. 

Fujimura's autobiographical book River Grace traces his spiritual and artistic journey, mastering of Nihonga technique lead him to an encounter with the beautiful.

Aijo (Compassionate Love)
Aijo (Compassionate Love)
Collection of Tokyo Contemporary Museum of Art
Mineral Pigments on Kumohada
90x250cm (5 panels)
1987

Aijo (Compassionate Love) was exhibited in Fujimura's first solo exhibit in Tokyo at Tamaya Gallery.  As a National Scholar at Tokyo University of Art, he began to incorporate American expression with Japanese tradition of Kacho-ga (Birds and Flowers paintings).  This work, along with other major works of the time, were purchased by Sanbi-Shosho Collection, and later donated to museums.

Fujimura writes in River Grace, an autographical essay of faith and art:

Painted in 1987, Aijo was based on a Japanese folk tale of the world's first couple. In this tale, their "Adam and Eve" were born attached at their backs.  They were always together, but they could not see each other's faces.

The Four Doors
The Four Doors
Collection of Yamaguchi Prefecture Museum of Art
Mineral Pigments, Gold on Kumohada
Water Tree
Water Tree
Collection of Sato Museum
Mineral Pigments, Platinum and Gold on Kumohada
1993
Columbine Dreams
Columbine Dreams
Mineral Pigments on Kumohada
Still Point - Morning Star
Still Point - Morning Star
Mineral Pigments and Gold on Kumohada
180x180 cm
2003
12th Night
12th Night
On Loan to Sato Museum
Mineral Pigments, Platinum and Gold on Kumohada
177x176 (diptych)
2008

Twelfth Night was commissioned for a museum tour Nihonga exhibit in Japan (To-ki-Michi, A Survey of Contemporary Nihonga, Ueno Royal Museum, Hakodate Museum, Ishikawa Prefectural Museum, and twelve other museums throughout Japan.) I overlapped a Shakesperian title with 12th, a day after 9/11.  This is an elergy in the form of a weeping cherry, Japanese symbol ephemeral beauty and now my personal symbol of enduring hope during dark times.